Stan Butterfield P.C., Attorney at Law

How Do I Make Sure My Kids Don’t Fight Over My Estate?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 22, 2015

How do I make sure my kids don’t fight over my estate? I get this question once in a while when I am creating an estate plan for a client. The long and short of this question is that while you can do a number of things to make things better, you can never completely … read more

What Are The Duties Of A Conservator In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 18, 2015

What are the duties of a conservator? The purpose of this post is to summarize the duties of a conservator for a minor or incapacitated person. This list is a pretty good summary for conservators in the state of Oregon. However, specific duties do vary from one state to another. The duties of a conservator … read more

What Are The Duties Of A Guardian In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 18, 2015

What are the duties of a guardian? There may be some specific differences from one jurisdiction to another, but in Oregon the following list is a pretty good summary. (If you have any questions about specific rights or duties involved in a guardianship, please ask a lawyer.) The duties of a guardian are also distinct … read more

Am I Responsible For The Debts Of A Deceased Loved One?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 11, 2015

Am I responsible to pay the debts of a deceased loved one? When a person dies, the question of how their debts will be paid is one of the first things that come up. This only makes sense, as the people left behind try to figure out how funeral expenses are going to be paid … read more

What Are The Personal Representative’s Fees In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 9, 2015

What are the personal representative’s fees in Oregon? The short answer to this question is around two percent of the gross value of the estate. Often I am asked how much money a person gets paid for doing the work of a personal representative. This question usually comes up when someone has been named in … read more

Can You Write Your Own Will In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 2, 2015

The short answer to this question is yes you can. You can get on the internet, use Google to find a form and write out a will and it might be valid. I practice law in Dallas, Oregon, a small town eleven miles West of Salem. We are a rural community and I think a lot of people here still have a little bit of the old pioneer mindset of self-reliance. This means that if they can do something on their own they prefer to do it that way. Also, I believe that many folks are trying to save money and think writing their own will is a good place to do it. … read more

How Much Does A Guardianship Cost In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on December 1, 2015

The short answer to that question is, it depends. The particular facts of a guardianship case can make significant differences in what the price for getting a guardian appointed will be. … read more

How Much Does A Will Cost In Oregon?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on November 30, 2015

Most people that are thinking about getting a will wonder how much it is going to cost. The answer is, it depends, but on average in Oregon it will cost somewhere between $1,000.00 and $1,500.00. I practice law in Dallas, Oregon and so on average what I charge is slightly less than this. In the Portland metropolitan area you may pay this amount or slightly more. Generally, if a married couple is getting a will done, the lawyer gives them a break on a two for one type basis. This estimate of the average price of a will is also based on the idea of a “simple” will, if you have a need for a will that plans for a less common situation such as a child with special needs that can affect the price as well. … read more

How does probate work in Oregon when there is no will?

Posted by Stan Butterfield on November 30, 2015

Despite the encouragement of a host of professionals: financial planners, CPA’s, and lawyers like me, who advise people to get a will, most people die without one. The law calls an estate without a will, “intestate.” This doesn’t mean that probate isn’t required, it just means probate happens a different way. The purpose of probate is to make sure that the decedent’s creditors’ bills are paid and that the decedent’s left over money and property are distributed to their survivors. … read more